Concord and Niagara grape juice and their phenolics modify intestinal glucose transport in a coupled in vitro digestion/caco-2 human intestinal model

Full Title: Concord and Niagara grape juice and their phenolics modify intestinal glucose transport in a coupled in vitro digestion/caco-2 human intestinal model

Journal: Nutrients

Year of Publication: 2016

PHHI Author(s): Mario Ferruzzi
Publication Author(s): Sydney Moser, Jongbin Lim, Mohammad Chegeni, JoLynne D Wightman, Bruce R Hamaker, Mario G Ferruzzi

Abstract:

While the potential of dietary phenolics to mitigate glycemic response has been proposed, the translation of these effects to phenolic rich foods such as 100% grape juice (GJ) remains unclear. Initial in vitro screening of GJ phenolic extracts from American grape varieties (V. labrusca; Niagara and Concord) suggested limited inhibitory capacity for amylase and α-glucosidase (6.2%-11.5% inhibition; p < 0.05). Separately, all GJ extracts (10-100 µM total phenolics) did reduce intestinal trans-epithelial transport of deuterated glucose (d7-glu) and fructose (d7-fru) by Caco-2 monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, with 60 min d7-glu/d7-fru transport reduced 10%-38% by GJ extracts compared to control. To expand on these findings by assessing the ability of 100% GJ to modify starch digestion and glucose transport from a model starch-rich meal, 100% Niagara and Concord GJ samples were combined with a starch rich model meal (1:1 and 1:2 wt:wt) and glucose release and transport were assessed in a coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Digestive release of glucose from the starch model meal was decreased when digested in the presence of GJs (5.9%-15% relative to sugar matched control). Furthermore, transport of d7-glu was reduced 10%-38% by digesta containing bioaccessible phenolics from Concord and Niagara GJ compared to control. These data suggest that phenolics present in 100% GJ may alter absorption of monosaccharides naturally present in 100% GJ and may potentially alter glycemic response if consumed with a starch rich meal.

Link to Article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27399765