Comparative genetic mapping reveals sentence and collinearity between the American cranberry and diploid blueberry genomes

Full Title: Comparative genetic mapping reveals sentence and collinearity between the American cranberry and diploid blueberry genomes

Journal: Molecular Breeding

Year of Publication: 2018

PHHI Author(s): Massimo Iorizzo
Publication Author(s): Brandon Schlautman, Luis Diaz-Garcia, Giovanny Covarrubias-Pazaran, Nathan Schlautman, Nicholi Vorsa, James Polashock, Elizabeth L. Ogden, Allan Brown, Ying-Chen Lin, Nahla Bassil, Emily J. Buck, Claudia Wiedow, Susan McCallum, Julie Graham, Massimo Iorizzo, Lisa J. Rowland, Juan Zalapa

Abstract:

Cranberry and blueberry are closely related and recently domesticated fruit crops in the genus Vaccinium. Both have a presumed American origin and likely evolved from a common ancestor; however, details of their adaptive radiation and the extent of their genomic divergence remains little understood. To better understand their evolutionary and genomic relationships, a set of 323 cross-transferable simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were identified, added to existing marker datasets, and used to construct linkage maps for cranberry (582 SSRs) and an interspecific diploid blueberry population (V. darrowii x V. corymbosum) x V. corymbosum (409 markers, densest blueberry SSR map currently available). The maps allowed for the first comparative genetic mapping study in Vaccinium, and revealed a surprisingly high degree of macro-synteny and collinearity between the cranberry and blueberry genomes. Approximately 93% of the blueberry linkage map was collinear with cranberry, while the remaining 7% (66.3 cM) was spread across 15 non-collinear regions detected in eight of the 12 linkage groups. These observations suggest that large-scale genome differentiation between the cranberry and blueberry genomes has not occurred during their evolution, and that sequence information will be highly transferable between the species in future genetic research and breeding. Finally, the set of 323 cross-transferable SSRs and linkage maps they were used to construct can serve as a shared resource for the Vaccinium research community, enabling additional comparative mapping studies, the identification and transfer of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes between species, and future exploration of evolutionary relationships in Vaccinium.

Link to Article: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11032-017-0765-y