Chemical and Sensory Properties of Greenhouse Tomatoes Remain Unchanged in Response to Red, Blue, and Far Red Supplemental Light from Light-emitting Diodes

Full Title: Chemical and Sensory Properties of Greenhouse Tomatoes Remain Unchanged in Response to Red, Blue, and Far Red Supplemental Light from Light-emitting Diodes

Journal: HortScience

Year of Publication: 2017

PHHI Author(s): Mario Ferruzzi
Publication Author(s): Michael P Dzakovich, Celina Gómez, Mario G Ferruzzi, Cary A Mitchell

Abstract:

In addition to photosynthesis, light is a critical mediator of secondary metabolism in plants, signaling the production of potentially health-promoting phytochemicals and regulating the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can alter the sensory perception of a tomato. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a viable way to test the effects of individual wavebands of light and are being quickly adopted by the greenhouse tomato industry. However, studies characterizing the effects of specific wavelengths of light or supplemental lighting on phytochemical content in general are lacking. We hypothesized that enriching the amount of supplemental blue and/or red light that tomatoes receive would positively affect the amount of carotenoids and phenolic compounds that accumulate in tomato fruits through cryptochrome and/or phytochrome-dependent signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, we compared the chemical and sensory characteristics of tomatoes grown with overhead high-pressure sodium (OH-HPS) lamps to those grown with intracanopy (IC)-LEDs emitting different ratios of red, blue, and far red light. Tomatoes were profiled for total soluble solids, titratable acidity, ascorbic acid content, pH, total phenolics, and prominent flavonoids and carotenoids. Our studies indicated that greenhouse tomato fruit quality was only marginally affected by supplemental light treatments. Moreover, consumer sensory panel data indicated that tomatoes grown under different lighting treatments were comparable across the lighting treatments tested. Our research suggests that the dynamic light environment inherent to greenhouse production systems may nullify the effects of wavelengths of light used in our studies on specific aspects of fruit secondary metabolism

Link to Article: http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/52/12/1734.abstract